Welcome

The Manteca Garden Club would like to invite you to join us in accomplishing our goals and sharing our enthusiasm for gardening.

Our club, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 1953, is a member of the Pacific Region, of the National Garden Clubs, Inc., and the Valley Lode District of California Garden Clubs, Inc. We also support our community through our membership in the Mayor’s Committee on the Arts and the Manteca Chamber of Commerce.

Our mission is to further the education of its members and the public in the areas of gardening, horticulture, botany, landscape design, conservation of natural resources, civic beautification, garden therapy and nature environmental studies.

FLOWER OF THE MONTH

November – Chrysanthemum

CHRYSANTHEMUM

Commonly called mums or tansies, this popular perennial’s name comes from the Greek chrysos (gold) and anthos (flower).

The chrysanthemum has been the focus of Oriental adulation for centuries. Mums were considered one of the four Chinese “noble plants” and were the official badge of the Old Chinese Army. Since chrysanthemums were considered the flower of the Chinese noble class, they were prohibited in a lower-class person’s garden.

The chrysanthemum has been the focus of Oriental adulation for centuries. Mums were considered one of the four Chinese “noble plants” and were the official badge of the Old Chinese Army. Since chrysanthemums were considered the flower of the Chinese noble class, they were prohibited in a lower-class person’s garden.

The Chinese believe that a chrysanthemum given to one’s beloved, after its being used to wipe one’s mouth after drinking wine, will ensure undying love and fidelity.

Called “kikus” in Japanese, chrysanthemums were featured on the Imperial Crest of Japan, and were so beloved by Japanese emperors that they sat upon chrysanthemum thrones. The Japanese still hold the chrysanthemum as a symbol of the sun, and they consider the orderly unfolding of the mum’s petals to be a symbol of perfection.

They also presume that a single chrysanthemum petal placed in the bottom of a wine glass encourages a long and healthy life.

While chrysanthemums generally denote cheerfulness and rest, individual colors do carry specific messages: red for love, good luck and best wishes; white for truth; and yellow for slighted love.

Chrysanthemums are welcomed throughout the British Isles and North America for any occasion. In Italy, however, their exclusive association with the dead makes chrysanthemums acceptable only for funerals.